Although our motorhome has the hookups for a clothes washer and dryer, we elected to not have them. We prefer to have the 4 large drawers for storage instead. To do laundry, we just use a local Laundromat. But at times, there are some clothes and shower towels that we would like to air dry. We looked at various drying racks, but none of them fitted our needs. So we made one out of PVC piping. For about $20 in parts, we have a large clothes drying rack that hangs on our rear ladder when needed, and folds apart for easy storage.

PVC Drying Rack

PVC Clothesline

Packed PVC Drying Rack

The completed drying rack hanging up. The clothes drying rack. The same rack, ready for storage.

PARTS:

The following parts were used in making the drying rack:

  • Three 10' lengths of 3/4" PVC pipe. Not all of it is used.
  • Two 3/4" PVC end caps.
  • Eight 3/4" PVC tees.
  • Six 3/4" PVC 90° elbows.
  • Two 3/4" 45°elbows.
  • Can of PVC pipe glue.
  • Plastic clothesline, at least 22'.

CUTS:

Cut the PVC pipe into the following sections:

  • Two pieces 2" long.
  • Two pieces 3" long.
  • Two pieces 22" long.
  • Two pieces 24" long.
  • Two pieces 28" long.
  • Three pieces 7" long.
  • Four pieces 8" long.
  • Four pieces 12" long.

ASSEMBLY:

I've drawn some instructions will show the dimensions of the various parts. Just cut the pieces, and assemble as shown. However, pay attention to what parts are glued together. There are 18 ends that ARE NOT glued together. This allows the rack to be disassembled for easier storage. In our case, the disassembled parts fit into a storage bag we have (also used for our PVC golf ball game). Drill holes evenly spaced apart (about 4 1/2" apart) and thread the clothesline through the holes. When I take it apart, I leave the clothesline threadedthe holes. When I take it apart, I leave the clothesline threaded.

Details of the PVC Drying Rack Details of the PVC Drying Rack
Closer view of details. Closer view of details.

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