In April 2003, we hosted a weekend event for Geocachers, called the "Arizona Geocaching Rendezvous". This weekend event included camping, 2 Pancake Breakfasts, a Geocaching Rally, a Cache In/Trash Out contest, and a Potluck Dinner. We held the event on AZ State Trust Land, with plenty of space in the beautiful Arizona desert. It seemed like we had the entire desert for ourselves out there. Geocaching guests were invited to attend any or all of the functions. We had some people spend the entire weekend, some came just for the rally, some just for the potluck dinner, and another came out Sunday morning for the pancake breakfast.

Pancake Breakfast:

Dale and Marion, of WEFINDUM, provided wonderful pancake breakfasts each morning, using a very large griddle. I understand Team A.J.J.R. is buying the griddle. Thanks Dale & Marion!

Potluck Dinner:

The Potluck Dinner was also a great success! We all enjoyed a wide variety of good food. The dinner was made extra special by the generosity of Cody & Cheryl, of CBx2. They brought out a large pot and deep fried a turkey out there! Boy, was it delicious! Thanks Cody & Cheryl.

Cache IN/Trash OUT:

Cody & Cheryl also provided special trash bags for the 1st Annual National Geocaching Cache IN/Trash OUT day. We held a contest for picking up the most trash, with Team A.J.J.R. winning a Special Geocaching T-Shirt, also provided by CBx2. Thanks again Cody & Cheryl.

Geocaching Rally:

The Geocaching rally was a special event. We had 12 teams participate, consisting of about 16 people. Participants had a 2-hour time limit to find 10 caches, within .75 miles. The most efficient route between caches was a 3.3 mile hike. They had to hike to the caches and were only provided the coordinates. Caches could be found in any order they desired. Sealed clues were also provided, but there was a time penalty added for opening a clue. The winner of the rally was determined by who found the most caches, in the least amount of time, within the 2-hour max limit. Finding a cache was as simple as finding the proper "codeword" for each cache. But.... there was a secret twist. Preliminary rules were provided well ahead of time. On purpose, these rules were extensive and in smaller print. They consistently stressed for the participant to read and obey the "Final" rules. Participants didn't get the final rules until they started the rally (teams started on 5 minute intervals). Their start package contained the final rules, the sealed clues, and a variety of Wile E. Coyote trivia. These final rules looked similar to the preliminary rules, EXCEPT for rules 25 and 26. Rule 25 stated the proper codeword would be a Latin name for Wile E. Coyote (Ex: Sloberus Vulgarious). Rule 26 warned to watch out for decoys and improper code words. Five of the hidden caches had decoys, which were easily found but contained invalid code words. The proper codeword was also there, just hidden a little harder. Since teams were under a time limit to find the caches, almost all the teams didn't read the final set of rules. So almost all teams found the caches and used the decoy codeword. The order of winners could have easily been changed if the rules were read they noticed rules 25 and 26. The team that found the most caches (9 out of 10) only had the correct codeword for 6 of them, and had a time penalty added. However, if they had read the rules, they would have finished 1st place since they found the most caches. Another team could have come in 1st place, if they hadn't opened a clue (adding a 15 minute time penalty). Funny though, they still didn't find the cache even with the clue. The team that won 1st place started their 2-hour time limit by sitting down and reading the final rules and reviewing what was in the start packet. They actually didn't start hunting caches until after 12 minutes had past. However, they knew to look for decoys and the proper code words. They only found 6 of the 10 caches, but all of them had the proper codeword and no time penalty.

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